So, what to do with written agreements? Or is it an area where how services understand and apply them is the key issue, not the practice itself? It seems obvious that any victim in a situation where coercive control is a risk would find it very difficult to comply with such an agreement. By the way. an explanation of why “Machiavelli” as an online identity/nickname sounds the alarm. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, being “Machiavellian” means “being cunning, conspiratorial and unscrupulous, especially in politics.” Hmmmm!!!!! Arguing online that written agreements are used as “smoke and mirrors” in child protection proceedings, even if one thinks they are “not worth the paper on which they are written,” surely reveals a character who is intriguing and unscrupulous? Trapped “in flagrante delicto” thinks me !! And, yes, I used THIS particular phrase on purpose! The review added: “Good practice suggests that written agreements are a statement of concerns from local authorities and advice to a parent that they are not a contract and therefore there is no obligation for parents to sign their agreement.” Only the actions of parents and professionals can ensure the safety of children – a paper agreement does not provide a guarantee. But if professionals think children are safer than they are because there is an agreement, there is a chance that they will take fewer steps to mitigate the risks. They will have a website to give you more information about the type of difficulties they can help and the services they offer. If you require brochures and fact sheets in other languages or Braille, please contact your local social service. You can also get independent advice, brochures and support from the Family Rights Group or, if you are an affected parent, from the Grandparents` Association. When social services check whether or not a child can stay home – or even sometimes when a child can go home after care – they may ask a parent to stick to different routines or techniques – for example, to communicate behavioral problems or boundaries to stick to a bedtime routine. Clean up regularly, do not allow drinking at home, report drug relapses – to check if parents are able to do these things consistently and work with the local authority.

Whether a parent can comply with the agreement is likely to be an important consideration when the social worker makes his or her recommendation. This article is an attempt to explain in a very general way what these agreements are and what they are: it is not legal advice on your case. Each case is unique. Everything looks very familiar. I used to get very frustrated as a social worker in a local authority when I was asked to write a written agreement in which a parent promised not to do things that were *illegal*. If they are willing to defy the law of the land, what is the point of a written agreement? I would take the argument of “covering the back of the LA” a little further – they are often used to derail the parent, sign an agreement known to be broken, so that provides the court with evidence that the parent cannot be trustworthy. She says such circumstances can often cause social workers to take children away from someone who is being abused because they are unable to prevent the abuser from doing the things set out in the written agreement. Everything that comes into a written agreement should be the basis of the “plan” in any environment (cin, cp, lake).

Think of a plan.. It defines the vision where everyone involved must help the child achieve (results), describes roles and expectations in a SMART way .. . . .