As part of the agreement, it was proposed to build on the existing Inter-Parliamentary Commission in English-Irish. Prior to the agreement, the body was composed only of parliamentarians from the British and Irish assemblies. In 2001, as proposed by the agreement, it was extended to include parliamentarians of all members of the Anglo-Irish Council. The vague wording of some so-called “constructive ambiguities”[8] helped ensure the adoption of the agreement and delayed debate on some of the most controversial issues. These include extra-military dismantling, police reform and the standardisation of Northern Ireland. The result of these referendums was a large majority in both parts of Ireland in favour of the agreement. In the Republic, 56% of the electorate voted, 94% of the vote voted in favour of the revision of the Constitution. The turnout was 81% in Northern Ireland, with 71% of the vote for the agreement. (a) to fulfil all official obligations in good faith; 7. Participants also noted that the British Government is, in principle, prepared, with broad support for political parties and, if necessary, after consultation with the Irish Government, to entrust responsibility for police and justice issues in the context of the ongoing implementation of the recommendations in this area. The agreement reaffirmed its commitment to “mutual respect, civil rights and religious freedoms for all within the Community.” The multi-party agreement recognized “the importance of respect, understanding and tolerance with regard to linguistic diversity,” particularly with regard to the Irish language, Ulster Scots and the languages of other ethnic minorities in Northern Ireland, “all of which are part of the cultural richness of the Island of Ireland.” (6) will insist that all new or amended trade agreements and other bilateral agreements between the United States government and the United Kingdom Government include conditions that require compliance with the obligations under the Good Friday Agreement.

Issues of sovereignty, civil and cultural rights, dismantling of arms, demilitarization, justice and police were at the heart of the agreement. 12. Full membership of the BIC will continue to monitor the functioning of the Council, including a formal review published at a reasonable date after the agreement enters into force, and will contribute, if necessary, to any revision of the comprehensive political agreement resulting from the multi-party negotiations. As part of the proposed agreement, the government has issued a number of financial and other commitments, as has the British government. Among the commitments made by the Irish Government is the work being done through the North-South Council of Ministers to carry out projects that benefit the people of the whole island, including greater connectivity, from the North and South and investments in the north-west region and border communities.