any delay in the event of “force majeure” where either party is unable to fulfil their obligations under the terms of this Treaty; neither party is then responsible for the termination of the contract. The customer is then responsible for calculating the payment equal to the rate per tonne per kilometre to the point where transport was interrupted. The customer is responsible for providing a bill of lading detailing all items supplied for transportation. By affixing their respective electronic signatures below, the parties agree to conclude, enforce and maintain the entire transport service contract for the agreed period. The customer reserves the right to terminate this contract at any time with written notice. In such a resignation. Unless the termination is due to a breach of this agreement by the carrier, the customer pays the costs per ton to the provider up to the place of termination. A service level agreement (SLA) is a contract between a logistics service provider and a customer that typically measurably determines the services that the logistics service provider will provide. Many logistics service providers make an SLA available to their customers. More recently, logistics departments of large companies have embraced the idea of writing a service level agreement so that services to their customers (users of other services within the company) can be measured, justified, and possibly compared to those of outsourcing network providers. Some core metrics or key performance indicators (KPIs) that may indicate SLAs include that if delivery is delayed due to gross negligence or negligence on the part of the service provider, the service provider will receive 48 hours for full delivery. If the supplier is unable to resolve the issue within the allotted time, the customer reserves the right to charge the carrier the delay of $20.00 per ton per day for each day of delay of the convoy/truck after 48 hours. In addition, the customer reserves the right to instruct another supplier to deliver late shipments.

The customer pays all transport costs such as toll roads, gympikes or unforeseen road costs. There should also be a QBR or Quarterly Business Review about the transportation company you choose. It should also be a treaty with agreements and milestones. This results in a specific SLA/KPI document. This voluminous document must be presented in phases, as it is large and has been agreed as a “win-win” document. Important comment: Always use cooperation and trust in your relationship with a logistics service provider. Not everything is the cost or the price debate. Let the logistics service provider show you their ability to be the professional you work with in this win-win partnership. The theme for you and your logistics partner should be: what is measured is achieved. If not, why not? What experience have you gained with logistics service level agreements or SLAs in any industry? Have they been effective? Which KPIs do you want to see? There are many other PCCs that can be added to this basic SLA agreement.

The more PPAs there are, the more difficult the negotiation process. It can take months to negotiate a complex SLA/KPI document, as you go back and forth with your logistics service provider, so the document becomes a “win-win” situation for both parties. After the approval of the SLA/KPI by both the customer and the logistics service provider, this document and its contents must first be checked monthly and then quarterly. Both sides will know how the partnership fits into the objectives of this SLA/KPI document. . . .